Book Section
Is a history of the lyric even conceivable? What would a lyric temporality look like? With a focus on Rainer Maria Rilke’s decision not to translate, but rather to rewrite Dante’s Vita nova (1293–1295) in the first of his Duineser Elegien (1912), the essay deploys reversion (as turning back, return, coming around again), alongside re-citation, as a keyword that can unlock the transhistorical operations of the lyric as the re-enactment of selected gestures under different circumstances.
Title
Reversion
Subtitle
Lyric Time(s) II
Author(s)
Francesco Giusti
Identifier
DOI Target
HTML Page
Description
Is a history of the lyric even conceivable? What would a lyric temporality look like? With a focus on Rainer Maria Rilke’s decision not to translate, but rather to rewrite Dante’s Vita nova (1293–1295) in the first of his Duineser Elegien (1912), the essay deploys reversion (as turning back, return, coming around again), alongside re-citation, as a keyword that can unlock the transhistorical operations of the lyric as the re-enactment of selected gestures under different circumstances.
Is Part Of
Re-
Place
Berlin
Publisher
ICI Berlin Press
Date
2019
Subject
lyric
gesture
transhistoricism
literary history
temporality
praise
chorality
community
re-citation
Dante
Rainer Maria Rilke
Rights
© by the author(s)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Harvested
yes
Language
en-GB
short title
Reversion
page start
151
page end
161
Source
Re-: An Errant Glossary, ed. by Christoph F. E. Holzhey and Arnd Wedemeyer, Cultural Inquiry, 15 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2019), pp. 151–61
Bibliographic Citation
Francesco Giusti, ‘Reversion: Lyric Time(s) II’, in Re-: An Errant Glossary, ed. by Christoph F. E. Holzhey and Arnd Wedemeyer, Cultural Inquiry, 15 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2019), pp. 151–61 <https://doi.org/10.25620/ci-15_19>
Format
application/pdf