Book Section2022-04-19
Johannes Wolf

Unlikely Matter

The Open and the Nomad in The Book of Margery Kempe and the Middle English Christina Mirabilis
In The Book of Margery Kempe, the protagonist shifts between identities and geographies as a nomadic subject, dispersed across compassionate responses to violence that unusually include a recognition of animal suffering. The Life of Christina the Astonishing also seizes on the nonhuman aspects of extreme affective experience as her bodily transformations participate in a process of becoming-animal. Both texts reflect a medieval fascination with the devotional body as a zone of closure and opening where transhuman and interspecies associations can be safely explored.
Title
Unlikely Matter
Subtitle
The Open and the Nomad in The Book of Margery Kempe and the Middle English Christina Mirabilis
Author(s)
Johannes Wolf
Identifier
Description
In The Book of Margery Kempe, the protagonist shifts between identities and geographies as a nomadic subject, dispersed across compassionate responses to violence that unusually include a recognition of animal suffering. The Life of Christina the Astonishing also seizes on the nonhuman aspects of extreme affective experience as her bodily transformations participate in a process of becoming-animal. Both texts reflect a medieval fascination with the devotional body as a zone of closure and opening where transhuman and interspecies associations can be safely explored.
Is Part Of
Place
Berlin
Publisher
ICI Berlin Press
Date
19 April 2022
Subject
Margery Kempe
Christina Mirabilis
Rosi Braidotti
animal studies
affect theory
devotional literature
spirituality
Rights
© by the author(s)
Except for images or otherwise noted, this publication is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Language
en-GB
page start
169
page end
189
Source
Openness in Medieval Europe, ed. by Manuele Gragnolati and Almut Suerbaum, Cultural Inquiry, 23 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2022), pp. 169–89
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